Contents

We are here to awaken from the illusion of our separation Thich Nhat Hanh

The ecological crisis — which is much greater than just climate change — is the greatest challenge that humanity has ever faced. Problems such as global warming, chemical pollution, and species extinction continue to worsen. In the face of these issues, many of us are experiencing confusion, weariness and frustration.

Why have the mindfulness movement and Buddhism been so slow to respond to the eco-crisis? Is there something in its teachings and practices that discourages or distracts us from such engagement? Do traditional teachings encourage indifference to what is happening in this world, because enlightenment involves “transcending" it in some way? Or is Buddhist practice just another version of psychological therapy because all my problems are simply due to the way my mind works? — which also implies indifference to social and ecological issues.

I came to realize clearly that mind is nothing other than rivers, mountains, and the great wide earth, the sun and the moon and the stars. Dogen, Japanese Zen-founder

Or is there another way to understand the Buddhist path? What does Buddhism really offer that can help us understand and respond appropriately? And what does the eco-crisis imply about how we understand and practice Buddhism? How do we honor our grief at what is happening? Can we really separate individual enlightenment or personal transformation from social transformation?

Ecodharma

Last year David Loy wrote a highly praised book on Ecodharma.

Program

The public lecture will consist of a presentation and dialogue with David Loy on his critical vision on Buddhism and the mindfulness movement in the modern world. And on his radical approach for social and personal transformation.

The two-day workshop consists of lectures, meditation practice periods and dialogue.

For whom

For anyone who is interested in these topics.

Starting dates

List of startdates for training The Ecological Crisis and Mindfulness